Surnames D to G

ELLIS Patrick Henry

Patrick Henry ELLIS was born in Dublin, Ireland abt 1775. He married Margaretha Magdalena JOUBERT on 14 Aug 1803 and died on 7 Aug 1850 . Family lore has it that Patrick and two brothers came to South Africa, but that the brothers "went back" - presumably to Ireland.

Unconfirmed records show:

Patric (now without the K?) Henry ELLIS is the eldest son of John Christiaan (Christian?) ELLIS and Joan Mary ELLIS (nee?). He was born in 1775 in Dublin, province of Leinster, Ireland. At age 16, in 1791, he joined the Norwegian Navy (don"t know if it was merchant or military) as a "student" sailor (in Afrikaans a "leerling matroos" ). His trade is given as blacksmith. With the British occupation of the Cape in 1795 he is in service of the occupation forces as blacksmith. In 1800 when the occupation forces withdrew he attained Cape citizenship. On 14 Aug 1803 he married in Drakenstein, Margaretha Magdalena JOUBERT, daughter of Gideon Jacobus JOUBERT and Maria Elizabeth van Zyl. Gideon Jacobus was the elder brother of Maria JOUBERT who was married to Jan LOOTS, the progenitor of the LOOTS family. Patric Henry ELLIS is one of the first pioneers that trekked east. He settled at Knysna (that later became part of the Swellendam district) where he worked as blacksmith and wagon maker (wa-maker). His first three children were christened here.

Between 1812 and 1816 he moved to Worcester where he started a wagon making business. When business became less prosperous he went back to Knysna in 1817 where he started a "saagpunt". (I have no idea what this is. A direct translation could be a "wood point". This could be a selling point or a sawmill). It is also possible that he went to Knysna to sell wood (If so, where did he get it from. Knysna was the centre for wood at the time), but also to get wood for his wagon-making. (It seems that he moved between Worcester and Knysna as it also said that he was in Worcester in 1823 again to build wagons.

In his latter years he settled in Francisbaai (Francis Bay - could this be St Francis Bay?) close to present day Port Elizabeth. He died there on 11 August 1850 at 75 years of age. He had 7 sons and one daughter.

Queries: His death notice gives his place of death as "Lange Berg" - I must confirm the relation between Lange Berg and Francis Bay. There is also reference of Louis Berg. His death notice is unclear.

Thanks to research by:
Adré Ellis This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Webpage http://users.lantic.net/adreellis/


Additonal data:

Supplied by: Daniel Eduard ELLIS

Patrick Ellis' background remains a mystery.

I have gone through sensus records, hunting licences, Oaths of Allegience to the Batavian Republic, Arrival and Departure Notes established during the British Occupation without success.

The names John and Mary as Patick's parents are suspect. I spent time in Ireland and found no trace of them.

At the time the British arrived in 1795 there were only four towns apart from Cape Town, namely Paarl, Stellenbosch, Swellendam and Graaff-Reinet and a few settlements. In the case of Worcester the name Wamakersvallei or Wamakersvlei is used as if it is a farm but Wamakersvallei was the name for the entire valley region from Paarl to beyond Worcester and Wamakersvlei was the former name of Wellington.

That Patrick moved from place to place often cannnot be true. To move to St Francis Bay over 350 kilometers away? To reach it by ox wagon would have taken roughly six weeks or even longer and why will a man do this, a man who would ultimately have over a hundred grandchildren!

As far as names are concerned, their birth date were obtained mainly from official sources and to a large extent from Dutch Reformed Church records as well as Heese and Lombaard and Pama. This gives an excellent idea of approximate location.

My interest is in the descendants of Patick's fifth son Daniel Eduard.He had 21 children.
I knew my great Grandfather born in 1843, a grandson of Patrick Henry Ellis whom he knew well.

 

 

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